SUMMER COURSES DESCRIPTIONS

ACC* 115 – Principles of Financial Accounting

Theory and practice of accounting for sole proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Original entry and general ledger, accounting equation, classification of accounts, preparation of working papers, adjusting and closing entries and financial statements; accounting for monetary assets and inventories; introduction to plant assets, depreciation; intangible assets and amortization; common and preferred stock; bonds and other long-term liabilities; and financial statement ratio analysis for decision making. As an important part of this course, the student will use microcomputers to solve accounting problems. Not open to students who have successfully completed ACC 111. Prerequisite: MAT 085 or MAT 094, MAT 095 or appropriate Mathematics Placement Test score.

ANT* 101 – Introduction to Anthropology

Introduction to major fields of anthropology (physical, cultural, etc.) with special emphasis on the understanding of human heritage in relation to history, culture, and environment. Formerly listed as ANTH 101, not open to students who have successfully completed ANTH 101.

ART* 100 – Art Appreciation
An introduction to the broad spectrum of the visual arts, past and present. Emphasis is upon the visual language employed by artists and the historical and cultural significance of works of art. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENG*101 or corequisite of ENG*097 or ESL 162.

ART* 101 – Art History I
A survey of the development of art and architecture from prehistoric times through the fourteenth century. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENG*101 or co-requisite of ENG*097 or ESL 162.

ART* 208 – Caribbean Art and Culture
An exploration of the aesthetic and instrumental values of Caribbean art and cultural history. The course will trace the artistic and intellectual responses to a wide range of issues and characteristics unique to the diverse Caribbean
region. An open invitation to experience the art process. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENG* 101 or ESL 162.

BIO* 100 – Basic Biology
This one-semester course is designed to provide the student a background in the basic concepts of biology with emphasis on characteristics of life, structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organisms, genetics, evolution and ecology. (This course cannot be used in place of BIO 105. Students who have completed BIO 105 or a higher level biology course are not eligible to take this course). Prerequisites: MAT 075 or mathematics placement scores for entry into MAT 095. 1. Level II score on reading placement test or successful completion of ENG 003. 2. Level II score on reading placement or successful completion of ENG 013. The alternate prerequisite is a grade of B- or better in ESL 153
A. (ESL 153A is ESL level IV).

BIO* 105 – Introduction to Biology
This one-semester course is designed to give the student a background in the basic concepts of biology with emphasis on characteristics of life, structure and function of the cells, tissues, organs, and organisms, genetics, evolution and
ecology. Prerequisite(s): eligibility for ENG* 101 and MAT* 075, MAT* 085 or eligibility for MAT* 095 via Placement Test.

BIO* 115 – Human Biology
Introductory course in human anatomy and physiology with brief consideration of the structure, histology, and functioning of the organ systems. Formerly listed as BIO 105, not open to students who have successfully
completed BIO 105. Prerequisite: 1. Level II score on reading placement test or successful completion of ENG*003. 2 or ENG* 013. The alternate prerequisite is a grade of B- or better in ENG* 153A (ESL level IV). Cannot be used to
satisfy requirements of the Nursing degree curriculum.

BIO* 211 – Anatomy & Physiology I
Basic course in human biology stressing chemical and physical principles governing body structure and function. Study includes organization and functions of the cell: development, histology, support and movement, neural control and integration. Formerly listed as BIO* 208, not open to students who have successfully completed BIO*
208. Prerequisites: BIO* 105 or BIO* 121 and CHEM* 111, CHEM* 121, or a proficiency exam.

BIO* 212 – Anatomy & Physiology II
This course is a continuation of BIO* 211. It provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, and histology; as well as the integrative
concepts of various systems, such as endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems; and inheritance and human development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth
understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Formerly listed as BIO 209, not open to students who have successfully completed BIO 209. Prerequisite: BIO* 211 or permission of the Department Chair.

BIO *235 – Microbiology
Study of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Host-parasite relationships, immunobiology, bacterial nutrition, physiology, and genetics are investigated. A grade of C is required for the Nursing Program. Formerly listed
as BIO 250, not open to students who have successfully completed BIO 250. Prerequisites: BIO* 105, and CHE* 111; or BIO* 212.

BIO* 260 – Principles of Genetics
Introduction to basic laws and theories of biological inheritance and variation. Formerly listed as BIO 270, not open to students who have successfully completed BIO 270. Prerequisites:
BIO* 105 and CHE* 111; or BIO* 212. Not open to students who have successfully completed previous BIO 207.

BBG* 236 – Commercial Law
An in-depth study of business organizations, including choice of entity, entity formation and operation, limitation of liability, and securities law; agency law, especially as it pertains to business organizations; and the regularity
environment in which business operates, including administrative law and consumer law. This course covers topics that are tested in the Business Structure component of the Business Environment and Concepts (BEC) section of the
CPA Exam, which component makes up approximately 20% of the BEC section. Not open to students who successfully completed BBG 234 before August 2013. Prerequisite: BBG 231 or BBG 234 (if taken after August 2013).

BFN* 110 – Personal Finance
This introductory course provides a hands-on, interactive approach to life skills management of personal finance and insurance. Using life skills management concepts, the student will be exposed to strategies for personal financial
planning, successful money management (savings strategies, managing debt), and personal risk management (life insurance, health insurance, property and casualty insurance). Following an overview and study of life skills
management concepts, the student will apply life skills management in the business environment. Students will create their own personal financial plan and will present the plan as a final project. Prerequisites: MAT* 095 or appropriate
Mathematics Placement Test score. BMG* 202 – Principles of Management The fundamentals of management and the
operation of organizations. Emphasis is placed on management orientation, planning, organizing, motivating, and controlling. The student is exposed to the ever changing tools required for decision-making. The course should
equip students to function in and understand the management area. Formerly listed as MGMT 101, not open to students who have successfully completed MGMT 101. Co-requisite: ENG* 043: Writing: Paragraph to Essay.

BMK* 201 – Principles of Marketing
An introductory study of how organizations market their products and services. The course examines how marketing management within a firm creates and implements a marketing strategy. The students will learn how to identify
the target market and build the product, price, promotion and place strategies that satisfy individual and organizational needs. Formerly listed as MKT 101, not open to students who have successfully completed MKT 101. Corequisite:
ENG* 043: Writing: Paragraph to Essay.

CHE* 111 – Concepts of Chemistry
This course covers basic principles governing chemical changes. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter and solution chemistry. Prerequisites: MAT* 085 with a grade of C- or better, MAT* 095 with a grade of C- or better, MAT* 104 with a grade of C- or better, or eligibility for MAT* 137 via the mathematics
placement test.

CHE* 121 – General Chemistry I
This is the first semester of a two semester university level general chemistry course. Elements, compounds, atomic structure, chemical bonding, gas laws and thermochemistry are key topics. Emphasis is placed on chemical calculations and problem solving. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MAT* 137, grade of C- or better in MAT* 139,
grade of C- or better in MAT* 184, or eligibility for MAT* 172 via qualifying score on mathematics placement test.

COM* 173 – Public Speaking
Basic instruction in public speaking with emphasis on improvement through practice exercises, gathering material, organization and delivery of speeches of varied lengths and types, and evaluative listening. Formerly listed as ENG
203, not open to students who have successfully completed ENG 203. Prerequisite: ENG* 101.

CSA* 105 – Introduction to Software Applications
This course teaches the use of the microcomputer as an office productivity tool. It covers creating and editing word processing documents, spreadsheets, and computerized visual presentations. Currently, the Microsoft Office software products Word, Excel, and PowerPoint are being taught in depth. In addition to office productivity tools, this course
covers file management using the Microsoft Windows operating system. Formerly listed as CIS 105, not open to students who have successfully completed CIS 105. Co-requisite: ENG* 073 or eligibility for ENG* 101.

CST* 201- Intro. to Mgmt. Info. Systems (MIS)
This course provides the background necessary for understanding the role of information systems in organizations and for using computer tools and technology in solving business problems. Topics include organization and technical foundations of information systems, theory of design of information, database, and network systems, e-commerce and supply chain systems, and information network security management. Microsoft Excel, Access, PowerPoint and Project are used to demonstrate selected topics. Prerequisite: ENG 073 or Eligibility for ENG 101.

CST* 246 – Networking Security
This course provides the student with the skills and knowledge needed to detect malicious programs and choose appropriate risk mitigation techniques to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of mission critical data.
The student will learn how to install, configure, and utilize open source resources to detect attacks and protect operating systems against malicious code including viruses, worms, and Trojans. The student will also learn how to use
authentication, authorization, and accounting to monitor and audit access to network resources. The course will also prepare the student for the Security+ certification exam. Prerequisite: CST* 231.

CST* 281 – Data Communications & Networking II

This course (part 2 of 3) continues where CTS* 231 concludes. The student progresses beyond the basics of communication networks and network configurations and delves into the study of actual networks and network software. Hands-on experience is obtained as each student networks two PC systems. Formerly listed as CIS
299, not open to students who have successfully completed CIS 299. Prerequisites: CST* 231.

ECE* 101- Introduction to Early Childhood Education
The history and philosophy of early childhood and criteria for establishing and evaluating developmentally appropriate early childhood programs are considered. This course may require visits, observation and participation in an
early childhood education setting. Co-requisite: ENG 043.

ECE* 215 – The Exceptional Learner
Emphasis is placed on how to identify, plan for, and work with children with various special education needs in an inclusive setting. Adaptations, methods, and techniques for including children with physical, mental, auditory, and social challenges will be explored. Techniques to stimulate the gifted will be reviewed as well. This course may require site visits, observation and participation in an early childhood education setting. Formerly listed as EDUC 247. Prerequisite: ECE* 101.

ECE* 275 – Child, Family & School Relations
An in-depth look at the child, the family, and the relationship between the school and the family. An understanding of the young child and age appropriate guidance for her or him will be examined. An understanding of how to
effectively communicate with families will be explored. Students will attempt to identify ways a school can develop a working relationship with today’s families. This course may require visits, observation and participation in an early
childhood education setting. Formerly listed as EDUC 229. This course may be used as an elective. Prerequisite: ECE* 101.

ECN* 101 – Principles of Macroeconomics
Basic survey course emphasizing Macroeconomics. Topics include the pricing system as an allocation model, the internal dynamic of the business cycle, the effects of capital deepening and technology on productivity and real wages, monetary theory and the effects of the Federal Reserve Board on bank reserves, and the international effects of
domestic policies and programs. Formerly listed as ECON 201, not open to students who have successfully completed ECON 201. Prerequisite: MAT*095 or Math Placement Test.

ECN* 102 – Principles of Microeconomics
Basic survey course emphasizing Microeconomics. Topics include elasticity, productivity and cost relationships, pricing and employment of productivity and cost relationships, pricing and employment of productive inputs, and the microeconomic foundations of economic growth. A study of the structure, conduct and performance of different
markets. Formerly listed as ECON 202, not open to students who have successfully completed ECON202. Prerequisite: MAT*095 or Math Placement Test.

ENG* 101 – Composition
Study of writing and the writing process. Students analyze expository essays in multiple genres and prepare writing projects with attention to rhetorical situations for audience and purpose, organization according to genre key features, development using detailed description, attention to language and conventions, and with support from outside
sources using MLA documentation. Students prepare revised writing in final portfolios complete with self-assessment letters. Required for all degree programs; to be completed within the first 15 credits. This course introduces
students to college level writing for academic inquiry about current social issues and may not include literary themes. Prerequisites: a) Qualifying score on placement test; OR b) achievement of a C- or better in both ENG* 043
and ENG* 073. In unusual situations, the department chair may grant a written waiver of one of the prerequisites to students as they exit either ENG* 013 or ESL* 153A.

ENG* 102 – Literature & Composition
Study of Literature and the writing process necessary for responding critically to reading in written compositions. Students read multiple works of literature in three literary genres: including fiction (short stories and/or novels),
poetry, and drama. Students use secondary sources pertaining to the Literature (short pieces of literary criticism, book reviews, and/or author interviews, etc.) to read the Literature itself more deeply and write about it through a
particular lens. Students prepare written compositions about the literature they read according to such approaches as reader’s response, inter-textual analysis, basic literary criticism, or other appropriate methods, including rhetorical and evaluative analysis. Students learn common literary terms and apply them in writing. Students write with attention to
audience and purpose, organization and development, language and conventions, and use MLA documentation. Though some sections of this course may be thematically focused, selections must represent a diversity of writers
and literary traditions from American, British, and World Literature so that the reading is as diverse as the student population, so that the reading showcases variety in the English language, and so that the reading represents the
breadth of human experience while expounding certain universals. This course introduces students to Literature, but it emphasizes writing about Literature in written compositions; it is a course in writing about reading, not creative
writing. Prerequisite: ENG* 101

ENG* 251- African-American Literature
This course introduces the African-American literary tradition. Students will read selected background works from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance, but will concentrate mostly on works of fiction and poetry by contemporary American writers of African ancestry, including some of Caribbean background. Prerequisite: ENG* 102.

ESL* 149 – Pronunciation Workshop
This course focuses on American English pronunciation and its application to typical conversational, reading and writing activities. Topics of study include the following: consonant and vowel sounds of English; stress,
rhythm and intonation patterns of words and phrases; patterns affecting speech such as deletions, insertions, and linking; and differences between spelling and speech. Students will practice listening and speaking exercises using a variety of techniques integrating them with conventional listening, speaking, reading and writing tasks.
This repetition will facilitate the acquisition of concepts presented in all ESL courses. Prerequisites: Specified score
in ESL placement test or successful completion of ESL Level 023 and 027. This course cannot be used to fulfill Humanities Elective Credit.

HIS* 101 – Western Civilization I
Ancient Egypt, the Near East, Classical Greece and Rome, and the Western world to 1660 are studied. Emphasis is placed on the contributions of these civilizations to the development of contemporary thought and institutions.
Formerly listed as HIST 101, not open to students who have successfully completed HIST 101. Corequisite: ENG* 043.

HIS* 121 – World Civilization I
A survey of the major ancient and classical civilizations, with emphasis on the foundations for a global economy, up to 1500. Formerly listed as HIST 105, not open to students who have successfully completed HIST 105.

HIS* 201 – U.S. History I
Survey of the colonial and revolutionary eras, followed by an examination of basic nineteenth century problems such as slavery, sectionalism, and the Civil War. Formerly listed as HIST 103, not open to students who have successfully
completed HIST 103. Co-requisite: ENG* 043.

HIS* 202 – U. S. History II
Institutions and forces at work in the United States since the Civil War, with emphasis on the historical background of contemporary political, social and economic problems. Formerly listed as HIST 104, not open to students who have
successfully completed HIST 104. Co-requisite: ENG* 043.

MAT* 095 – Elementary Algebra (3 Semester Hours: No Credit)
Elementary Algebra addresses algebraic symbolism, properties of the real numbers, operations on algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, operations on polynomials, laws of exponents, factoring,
solving quadratic equations by factoring, graphing equations, finding equations of lines, applying algebra to geometry, introduction to metric system, converting between units of measure, and scientific notation. This course requires use of a scientific calculator. Prerequisite: qualifying score on Placement Test.

MAT* 104 – Quantitative Reasoning
Quantitative reasoning- the ability to critically examine, explore, analyze and manipulate quantitative information- is an essential skill for academic and career success in the 21st century. In this course, students will explore real world
situations and develop critically important numerical reasoning, proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, and statistical thinking abilities. Topics include mathematical problem solving, proportions, linear and exponential
functions, mathematical modeling, descriptive statistics, and mathematics of personal finance. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: Qualifying score on Placement Test.

MAT* 137 – Intermediate Algebra
This course builds on the Introductory Algebra foundation, deepening the study of some topics, and introducing new ones. Topics include equations and inequalities, graphing, relations and functions, radicals and quadratics, and
systems of equations. Real world applications of the listed topics will be highlighted. This course will include use of a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: MAT* 085 with a grade of C- or better, MAT* 095 with a grade of C- or better,
MAT* 104 with a grade of C- or better, or qualifying score on Placement Test. MAT* 167 – Principles of Statistics
This course addresses descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and probability. The descriptive methods include the concept of population versus sample, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and measures of dispersion. The inferential methods involve hypothesis testing, point and interval estimation, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance. Topics from probability include sample spaces, laws of probability, as
well as discrete and continuous probability distributions. This course requires use of a graphing calculator with statistics capability. The course may require use of a computer-based statistics package. Prerequisite: MAT* 137,
MAT* 139, MAT* 184, MAT* 104 with a grade of C+ or better, or qualifying score on mathematics Placement Test.

MAT* 172 – College Algebra
Course presents higher-level topics in algebra needed for success in pre-calculus and, ultimately, the calculus series. Topics include a review of linear, quadratic, and radical functions, systems of equations, matrix algebra, systems of
linear and nonlinear inequalities, functions, inverse and composite functions, transformations of functions, laws of logarithms, exponential and logarithmic functions, and conic sections. Students will model and explore real
world applications using the topics listed. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator (preferably TI-83+). Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MAT* 137, grade of C- or better in MAT* 139, grade of C- or better in MAT* 184, or qualifying score on Placement Test.

MAT* 186 – Pre-Calculus
Algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry are studied. Topical considerations include: composite functions, polynomial and rational functions, trigonometric functions, applications of trigonometry to right and oblique triangles,
complex numbers, operations with vectors, polar coordinates, parametric equations, sequences, series, summation notation, binomial theorem. This course will require the use of a graphing calculator. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MAT* G172, or qualifying score on the placement test.

MAT* 230 – Applied Calculus w/Modeling
Course in selected topics from calculus with applications in business, economics, and social science. This course is intended for students pursuing degrees in social and behavioral sciences, business and management. Topics
include linear and non-linear functions, limits, derivatives and integrals. This course requires the use of a graphing calculator (preferably TI-83+). Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MAT* G137, grade of C- or better in MAT*G139, grade of C- or better in MAT* G184, or qualifying score on Placement Test.

MED* 131 – Clinical Medical Assisting
Focus of this course is on the clinical skills commonly utilized in medical settings. Includes sterile techniques, vital signs and exam procedures, history taking, and chart documentation. Formerly listed as MED 103, not open to students who have successfully completed MED 103. Prerequisites: MED* 170, BIO* 115, CSA 105, and MED 125.
MUS* 101 – Music History & Appreciation I A foundation for intelligent and appreciative listening and understanding through knowledge of characteristics, media and structure of various global music traditions. Indigenous folk, popular
and classical practices and traditions will be studied. Vocal and instrumental music, musical styles, interpretation and the principles of aesthetics will also be studied. Lectures, discussions, recordings and attendance at live performances are employed. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENG* 101 or co-requisite of ENG* 097 or ESL* 162.

MUS* 104 – World Music
A foundation for intelligent and appreciative listening and understanding through knowledge of the characteristics, media, and structure of various global music traditions. Indigenous folk, popular and classical practices and traditions will be studied. Vocal and instrumental music, musical styles, interpretation and the principles of aesthetics will also be studied. Lectures, discussions, recordings, and attendance at live performances are employed. Prerequisite: eligibility for ENG* 101 or co-requisite of ENG* 097 or ESL* 162.

PHL* 101 – Introduction to Philosophy
This course will introduce students to the major fields within Greco-Roman philosophical tradition. They will study ideas, theories, and personalities of philosophy through the biographies and writings of leading thinkers. They will learn how the theories of classical philosophers can help them resolve moral, political, practical and spiritual questions that confront humans in day-to-day life. Students will develop their own philosophical perspective on modern social, political, and religious issues through their contemporary application of the theories learned. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101.

PHL* 111 – Ethics
Introduction to the major ethical systems in Western philosophy and to current moral language, moral decision, and selected contemporary problems in ethics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101.

POL* 111 – American Government
Study of the United States’ national government, including the Constitution, Congress, the presidency, the judiciary, administrative agencies, and political parties, with particular attention to their evolution, organization, and
functions. Formerly listed as PLSC 201, not open to students who have successfully completed PLSC 201.

PSY* 204 – Child & Adolescent Development
Development of the child from conception through adolescence, with focus on physical, cognitive, social and emotional growth. Both hereditary and environmental influences are considered. Formerly listed as PSY 232, not open
to students who have successfully completed PSY 232. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 recommended, Co-requisite: ENG* 043.

PSY* 245 – Abnormal Psychology
In-depth study of abnormal behavior. Topics include theoretical perspectives of abnormality, classification systems (DSM-5), and the prevalent groups of disorders: anxiety, personality, schizophrenic, mood, psychoactive substance,
and developmental. Stress and psychophysiological symptoms are discussed, as are maladaptive behaviors of childhood and adolescence brain disorders and aging. Formerly listed as PSY 260, not open to students who have successfully completed PSY 260. Prerequisite: PSY* 111.

PSY* 247 – Industrial & Organizational
Psychology A comprehensive study that introduces the student to the applications of psychology in the work place. The three main topic areas to be covered: organizational psychology, human factors psychology, and personnel psychology.
Formerly listed as PSY 247, not open to students who have successfully completed PSY 247. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 recommended.

PSY* 253 – Multicultural Issues in Psychology
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of diversity issues and invite a healthy dialogue on multicultural topics. Emphasis will be placed on the relations between different groups and the impact on the individual
members of the group. The course will assist in developing awareness, particularly for those interested in working in multicultural settings, of the varying needs of a pluralistic society. Lectures will be structured to permit open discussion and critical reflection grounded in both personal experience and scholarly readings. Formerly listed as PSY 253, not open to students who have successfully completed PSY 253; not open for credit to students who have successfully passed PSY* 253. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 recommended.

SOC* 101 – Principles of Sociology
Basic sociology principles as they apply to culture, personality, group structures, and major social institutions. Formerly listed as SOC 201, not open to students who have successfully completed SOC 201. Co-requisite: ENG* 043.
SOC* 210 – Sociology of the Family Development of the family as an institution with emphasis on patterns and problems of family relationships. Examined are cultural variations in the American family and urban family problems.
Formerly listed as SOC 236, not open to students who have successfully completed SOC 236. Prerequisite: SOC* 101.

SOC* 235 – Introduction to Social Welfare
Services and techniques used in providing for public welfare are studied. Emphasis is placed on historical development of social services, extent of private and governmental participation in providing social services, and major processes
associated with the field. Speakers and visits are used to survey existing services in the Greater Hartford area. Formerly listed as SOC 230, not open to students who have successfully completed SOC (Students enrolling in this course
are required to conduct 25 hours of service learning. Please consult an academic advisor or program coordinator regarding service learning requirements).

SPA* 101 – Elementary Spanish I
Introduction to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, with emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Designed for students with one year or less of satisfactory completion of high school Spanish.
Not intended for native speakers of Spanish. Heritage speakers of Spanish may take SPA* 107. SPA* 102 – Elementary Spanish II A continuation of Elementary Spanish I. Further development of basic oral and writing proficiency. Prerequisite: SPA* 101 or equivalent, i.e., two years of satisfactory completion of high school Spanish. Not intended
for native speakers of Spanish. Heritage speakers of Spanish may take SPA* 107.