CAPITAL STUDENTS GET BIG GAINS FROM COLLEGE GAMES

DATE: November 21, 2017
CONTACT: Damaris Torres
Thu Nguyen
PHONE:     860-906-5130
EMAIL:  ca_learnmore@capitalcc.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Continuing Education Scavenger Hunt

From Left to Right – Camila Forde, Paba Pittegama Giamlath, and Liza Pollard capture their success at finding a required  “scavenger hunt” destination.

Heading to college, and starting a new career can be a daunting task for anyone.  And if you happen to be fresh out of high school, the first in your family to make the big leap, or if you’ve been away from school for a long time, it can be even more intimidating.  To address those dynamics, Capital Community College’s Continuing Education staff recently applied a non-traditional approach to meet student needs.

“We know many of our students begin their college and career journeys in the Continuing Education Division by taking professional development or career certificate courses.  They’re looking to gain skills that’ll get them into the workforce quickly.   Coming in through the Continuing Education Division allows them to step forward into the college experience, in a manner that meets their immediate and long-term goals”, says Linda Guzzo, Dean, School of Workforce and Continuing Education.

She and her staff constantly look for ways to make that transition easier, while providing value to the students they serve.  This fall, in addition to regular programming, Continuing Education staff, implemented new interactive orientation workshops to engage students and welcome them into their new academic community.

In a series of orientation sessions led by instructors, Randall Ward (Job Developer), and Joette Johnson (Case Manager) students were encouraged to explore Capital’s departments, and facilities, as well as meet staff, as part of “in-class instruction”.  The activity centered on team building, friendly competition, mobile technology and prizes.   For designated class periods, Ward and Johnson abandoned traditional lectures in favor of student led scavenger hunts. In order to document participation, students were required to take “selfies” with their teammates and Capital staff at each of the various locations.  “We noticed that many of our students just come to class and go home.   Sometimes they don’t even know we have a library, student tutoring, or the FIRST Center (a financial education, budget coaching and legal services resource) much less where they’re located” explained Johnson.

Capital’s Continuing Education student engagement methods not only incorporate fun, and community building, but are designed to increase student success, and course completion.  Ward, observed that students who become involved early in their college experience are more likely to “stick it out”.   He adds, “The scavenger activity as we’ve designed it, helps build classroom camaraderie.  It creates an environment where people have to communicate with each other to accomplish a goal.  In the process it brings energy, creates a shared memory, and sparks friendships.  As people get to meet and interact they’re more likely to be and feel supported in their environment.  We want students to do well and feel comfortable here.”

In addition to an overview of College and course expectations, orientation subjects include time management, study skills, workplace and emotional intelligence, resume and cover letter preparation, as well as job search and interview techniques.

Marie Brooks, a CNA student at Capital will graduate next month.  She participated in the orientation, and she’s glad she did. “The workshops helped me to become more organized.  At a recent career fair, I knew what to say to potential employers.  Before, I never prepared for interviews, and I never knew that I should come with prepared questions to ask employers. I came [to the career fair] prepared.   Today, two companies contacted me and expressed interest in interviewing me again,” Brooks said.

“It’s a holistic approach to skills training and career advancement”, explained Guzzo.  The Dean notes although the Continuing Education Division is often the first stop for students entering or reentering college, for many it’s not the last.  “Part of our job is to ensure we equip students with the skills and support needed to accomplish their goals. The scavenger activity is a simple, but effective exercise that proves to students, if you’re willing to do your part, work with others, and ask for help, you can succeed and have fun doing it. “

Capital’s Continuing Education student engagement methods not only incorporate fun, and community
building, but are designed to increase student success, and course completion.

Ward, observed that students who become involved early in their college experience are more likely to
“stick it out”. He adds, “The scavenger activity as we’ve designed it, helps build classroom
camaraderie. It creates an environment where people have to communicate with each other to
accomplish a goal. In the process it brings energy, creates a shared memory, and sparks friendships.
As people get to meet and interact they’re more likely to be and feel supported in their environment.
We want students to do well and feel comfortable here.”

In addition to an overview of College and course expectations, orientation subjects include time
management, study skills, workplace and emotional intelligence, resume and cover letter preparation,
as well as job search and interview techniques.

Marie Brooks, a CNA student at Capital will graduate next month. She participated in the orientation,
and she’s glad she did. “The workshops helped me to become more organized. At a recent career fair,
I knew what to say to potential employers. Before, I never prepared for interviews, and I never knew
that I should come with prepared questions to ask employers. I came [to the career fair] prepared.
Today, two companies contacted me and expressed interest in interviewing me again,” Brooks said.

“It’s a holistic approach to skills training and career advancement”, explained Guzzo. The Dean notes
although the Continuing Education Division is often the first stop for students entering or reentering
college, for many it’s not the last. “Part of our job is to ensure we equip students with the skills and
support needed to accomplish their goals. The scavenger activity is a simple, but effective exercise that
proves to students, if you’re willing to do your part, work with others, and ask for help, you can
succeed and have fun doing it. “


                         

 

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